South Bay

Overview

Although the South Bay is a collection of different cities within LA County, it is truly a community in and of itself. People from the South Bay are proud of their beaches, casual lifestyle, and take joy in having some of the most user-friendly beaches, and nicest people, around. The South Bay is made up of Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach and Torrance.

These cities are made up of downtown areas filled with shops, restaurants, and pubs with the main focus being the beautiful beaches. All along the beach, people walk, run, skate, or cruise along the strand watching the endless waves, countless games of volleyball, and the dolphins swimming by. The South Bay is the birthplace of beach volleyball, and the area has produced some of the best volleyball players in the world.

Water Quality

For the most part, the South Bay has great water quality. Brilliant stretches of white sand beaches flank open ocean beaches that are some of the cleanest in Los Angeles. In 2010, the only area of concern in the South Bay was in Redondo Beach, at the Redondo Beach Pier. These high levels of bacteria could be due to scraps tossed off the Pier by fishermen, or the birds that come to feast on those scraps.

Heal the Bay Gets Local

The South Bay is home to much of Heal the Bay’s work. From the proposed desalination plant near the El Segundo power plant on Rosecrans Avenue, to our education programs at the Manhattan Beach Roundhouse and the Redondo Beach SEA Lab, Heal the Bay is working on a myriad of projects in this community, including supporting a Manhattan Beach plastic bag ban, classroom education and beach cleanups.

Phytoplankton (a.k.a. tiny marine plants) produce half the planet's food and there are signs that their numbers are plummeting as the seas warm, according to a recent article in the magazine New Scientists.
Phytoplankton, Climate Change, Ocean, Heal the Bay, Science, Marine Biology
What better way to celebrate the 42nd Earth Day than by getting your very own rain barrel? Harvesting rainwater protects the ocean from urban runoff and conserves potable water.
Get your own low-cost rain barrel and help preserve the ocean from urban runoff
This week’s blogger is Stephen Mejia, a Southern California native who majored in Environmental Studies at UC Santa Cruz and has been interning with Heal the Bay's programs and education departments. I grew up in the South Bay. Its patchwork of str…
A creek flows through Compton? los angeles, compton creek, watershed
Today the Los Angeles City Council's Energy and Environment Committee took a bold step towards a double-ban on single-use plastic and paper bags.  The Committee's unanimous recommendation, led by Councilmember Paul Kortez, would require a phased…
Plastic Bag, Bag Ban, Los Angeles (image from Change.org's Denver Ban)
Heal the Bay has been leading the fight to end the fiscal and environmental waste created by single-use shopping bags for five years. So we were heartened today to see the Los Angeles Times' editorial board urging the Los Angeles City Council to adop…
Los Angeles Times, Plastic Bags
Today's blogger is Kirsten James, Heal the Bay's water quality director. All too often when I mention the topic of TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads), people’s eyes start to glaze over. What’s a TMDL you ask? It’s a calculation of the maximum …
TMDL, Sampling, EPA, Water Quality, Science
The Hermosa Beach City Council has voted in favor of banning single-use polystyrene (better known as Styrofoam) food containers.  Originally proposed by the city’s Green Task Force back in 2010, the ban is set to go into effect in 180 days if …
The Hermosa Beach City Council voted in favor of banning single-use Styrofoam
Today's blogger is Susie Santilena, an environmental engineer in water quality at Heal the Bay.
Heal the Bay works with the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission
Thursday was a busy day for Heal the Bay. We cleaned up – literally and figuratively – with two of our biggest supporters: The Los Angeles Lakers and Whole Foods. We divided our forces, with teams of staff and volunteers simultaneously scattering…
Andrew Bynum collecting trash: LA Lakers / Delta Corporate Healer Beach Cleanup
Overwatering is wasteful and moves trash and toxins to the ocean. Turn off the faucet when you don't need it. Fix leaky pipes and install low-flow shower heads and toilets. By conserving water, you can put less stress on sewage treatment plants and …
Ten Ways to Heal the Bay Don't be a Drip Video, water
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