Marina del Rey / Playa del Rey

Overview

Marina del Rey is the boating center of West Los Angeles, home to million dollar yachts and ancient dinghies. Visitors can take whale watching or fishing trips from the Marina, or even charter a cruise or arrange a trip to Catalina. Unfortunately, boats, and the accompanying structures, can bring water quality problems. Playa del Rey, just to the south, is a beach community home to Loyola Marymount University and the Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats sewage from all of Los Angeles.

Water Quality

The main swimming beach in the marina, Mothers Beach, has long-term pollution problems due to the lack of wave action and circulation. Although it has few waves, and the water is generally warm, it’s not a good place to swim. Dockweiler Beach just down the coast in Playa del Rey is a much better choice, though Ballona Creek’s outfall does contribute to water quality problems there. If you’re swimming at Dockweiler, check the Beach Report Card for your specific location, and make sure to avoid any outfalls.

Heal the Bay Gets Local

Mothers Beach has always been a large part of Heal the Bay’s work in Marina del Rey. We work on solutions to improve tidal circulation and educate people about avoiding polluted beaches. Heal the Bay was founded because of Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, and we were very involved with the updating of this facility. Now, Hyperion is a world-class sewage treatment plant.

Just in time for summer vacation planning, weather information site Weather Underground is now providing Heal the Bay’s Beach Report Card grades to beachgoers in California and the Pacific Northwest on its Beach Weather pages, potentially reac…
beach, weather, water quality, surfers, swimmers, beachgoers
Today’s blog post is by Aquarium Education Specialist Amanda Jones  Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh! Greetings from Camp, by the Water Having so much fun, by the pier Discovering creatures from deep and seashore near Open Ocean and Rocky Shore…
Santa Monica Pier Aquarium, Summer Science Adventure Camp, Kids
May 4, 2012 Heal the Bay’s campaign to “Take L.A. By Storm” got off to a great start yesterday, with concerned citizens telling the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control board to set strong pollution limits as it debates a new stormwater p…
Taking L.A. By Storm, MS4 Stormwater Permit, Clean Water Act, Water Pollution
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Photo Credit: Sea Education Association, plastic pollution, marine debris,
Today’s guest blogger is Edward Murphy, secondary education coordinator at Heal the Bay April 27, 2012 Throughout April, as we here at Heal the Bay celebrated Earth Month, I got to spend time with my favorite students and community groups in Compto…
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Reusable Bag - Photo by Molly Peterson, KPCC
To help celebrate Earth Day, Heal the Bay will partner with Ralphs Grocery Company to provide resources for Coastal Cleanup Day, the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium and a Heal the Bay activity guide highlighting ways to for kids to prevent marine pollut…
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Phytoplankton (a.k.a. tiny marine plants) produce half the planet's food and there are signs that their numbers are plummeting as the seas warm, according to a recent article in the magazine New Scientists.
Phytoplankton, Climate Change, Ocean, Heal the Bay, Science, Marine Biology
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