Marina del Rey / Playa del Rey

Overview

Marina del Rey is the boating center of West Los Angeles, home to million dollar yachts and ancient dinghies. Visitors can take whale watching or fishing trips from the Marina, or even charter a cruise or arrange a trip to Catalina. Unfortunately, boats, and the accompanying structures, can bring water quality problems. Playa del Rey, just to the south, is a beach community home to Loyola Marymount University and the Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats sewage from all of Los Angeles.

Water Quality

The main swimming beach in the marina, Mothers Beach, has long-term pollution problems due to the lack of wave action and circulation. Although it has few waves, and the water is generally warm, it’s not a good place to swim. Dockweiler Beach just down the coast in Playa del Rey is a much better choice, though Ballona Creek’s outfall does contribute to water quality problems there. If you’re swimming at Dockweiler, check the Beach Report Card for your specific location, and make sure to avoid any outfalls.

Heal the Bay Gets Local

Mothers Beach has always been a large part of Heal the Bay’s work in Marina del Rey. We work on solutions to improve tidal circulation and educate people about avoiding polluted beaches. Heal the Bay was founded because of Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, and we were very involved with the updating of this facility. Now, Hyperion is a world-class sewage treatment plant.

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