Marina del Rey / Playa del Rey

Overview

Marina del Rey is the boating center of West Los Angeles, home to million dollar yachts and ancient dinghies. Visitors can take whale watching or fishing trips from the Marina, or even charter a cruise or arrange a trip to Catalina. Unfortunately, boats, and the accompanying structures, can bring water quality problems. Playa del Rey, just to the south, is a beach community home to Loyola Marymount University and the Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats sewage from all of Los Angeles.

Water Quality

The main swimming beach in the marina, Mothers Beach, has long-term pollution problems due to the lack of wave action and circulation. Although it has few waves, and the water is generally warm, it’s not a good place to swim. Dockweiler Beach just down the coast in Playa del Rey is a much better choice, though Ballona Creek’s outfall does contribute to water quality problems there. If you’re swimming at Dockweiler, check the Beach Report Card for your specific location, and make sure to avoid any outfalls.

Heal the Bay Gets Local

Mothers Beach has always been a large part of Heal the Bay’s work in Marina del Rey. We work on solutions to improve tidal circulation and educate people about avoiding polluted beaches. Heal the Bay was founded because of Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, and we were very involved with the updating of this facility. Now, Hyperion is a world-class sewage treatment plant.

April 25, 2012 Today’s guest blogger is Melissa Aguayo, speakers bureau manager at Heal the Bay We are in the middle of the second week of Chivas USA’s Recycling Competition in which Castelar Elementary and Glassel Park Elementary duke it out to …
Heal the Bay teams up with Chivas USA to promote recycling at local schools
April 19, 2012 When a multilingual metropolis such as Los Angeles wants to encourage its residents to forgo their plastic and paper bags in favor or reusable ones, it takes a lot of talking and translating.
Reusable Bag - Photo by Molly Peterson, KPCC
To help celebrate Earth Day, Heal the Bay will partner with Ralphs Grocery Company to provide resources for Coastal Cleanup Day, the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium and a Heal the Bay activity guide highlighting ways to for kids to prevent marine pollut…
Ralphs bolsters its support of Heal the Bay's mission with a $25,000 donation
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Phytoplankton, Climate Change, Ocean, Heal the Bay, Science, Marine Biology
What better way to celebrate the 42nd Earth Day than by getting your very own rain barrel? Harvesting rainwater protects the ocean from urban runoff and conserves potable water.
Get your own low-cost rain barrel and help preserve the ocean from urban runoff
Today the Los Angeles City Council's Energy and Environment Committee took a bold step towards a double-ban on single-use plastic and paper bags.  The Committee's unanimous recommendation, led by Councilmember Paul Kortez, would require a phased…
Plastic Bag, Bag Ban, Los Angeles (image from Change.org's Denver Ban)
Heal the Bay has been leading the fight to end the fiscal and environmental waste created by single-use shopping bags for five years. So we were heartened today to see the Los Angeles Times' editorial board urging the Los Angeles City Council to adop…
Los Angeles Times, Plastic Bags
Today's blogger is Kirsten James, Heal the Bay's water quality director. All too often when I mention the topic of TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads), people’s eyes start to glaze over. What’s a TMDL you ask? It’s a calculation of the maximum …
TMDL, Sampling, EPA, Water Quality, Science
Today's blogger is Susie Santilena, an environmental engineer in water quality at Heal the Bay.
Heal the Bay works with the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission
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