Long Beach / Avalon

Overview

Although close geographically, Long Beach and Avalon couldn’t be more different. Long Beach is home to massive container ships and the shipping center of the Southland. Avalon, the quaint town on Catalina Island, is home to beautiful beaches and incredible diving and snorkeling.

Water Quality

Long Beach has some beautiful, clean open ocean beaches. But, as you get closer to the mouth of the LA River, which receives pollution from all over the county, and the Port of LA, water quality becomes a real problem. Because of the combination of clean and polluted beaches, Long Beach is a great example of why it's important to familiarize yourself with water quality patterns at your favorite beaches by using the Beach Report Card.  In Avalon, on the other hand, while the waters are clear and full of marine life, local beaches consistently have unacceptably high levels of bacteria. These bacteria, which are from unknown causes, can make swimmers sick.

Heal the Bay Gets Local

Heal the Bay is involved in solving some of Long Beach's most troubling pollution problems. We are working on cleaning up the Los Angeles river (through pollution limits and plastic bag legislation) and tackling some of the contaminated sediments that come from heavy industry. We also work closely with the wonderful Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, in nearby San Pedro. On Catalina Island, we are working with local representatives to identify and remediate those high bacteria levels. We’re also working to develop Marine Protected Areas, which would limit fishing in these precious waters.

Just in time for summer vacation planning, weather information site Weather Underground is now providing Heal the Bay’s Beach Report Card grades to beachgoers in California and the Pacific Northwest on its Beach Weather pages, potentially reac…
beach, weather, water quality, surfers, swimmers, beachgoers
May 4, 2012 Heal the Bay’s campaign to “Take L.A. By Storm” got off to a great start yesterday, with concerned citizens telling the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control board to set strong pollution limits as it debates a new stormwater p…
Taking L.A. By Storm, MS4 Stormwater Permit, Clean Water Act, Water Pollution
The answer is blowing in the wind for oceanographers who have discovered that gusts of wind push plastic debris below the surface of the water, rendering previous data gathered by skimming the surface inaccurate.
Photo Credit: Sea Education Association, plastic pollution, marine debris,
Today’s guest blogger is Edward Murphy, secondary education coordinator at Heal the Bay April 27, 2012 Throughout April, as we here at Heal the Bay celebrated Earth Month, I got to spend time with my favorite students and community groups in Compto…
Compton, Ian Somerhalder, Big Sunday, cleanup, Earth Day
April 25, 2012 Today’s guest blogger is Melissa Aguayo, speakers bureau manager at Heal the Bay We are in the middle of the second week of Chivas USA’s Recycling Competition in which Castelar Elementary and Glassel Park Elementary duke it out to …
Heal the Bay teams up with Chivas USA to promote recycling at local schools
Phytoplankton (a.k.a. tiny marine plants) produce half the planet's food and there are signs that their numbers are plummeting as the seas warm, according to a recent article in the magazine New Scientists.
Phytoplankton, Climate Change, Ocean, Heal the Bay, Science, Marine Biology
What better way to celebrate the 42nd Earth Day than by getting your very own rain barrel? Harvesting rainwater protects the ocean from urban runoff and conserves potable water.
Get your own low-cost rain barrel and help preserve the ocean from urban runoff
Today the Los Angeles City Council's Energy and Environment Committee took a bold step towards a double-ban on single-use plastic and paper bags.  The Committee's unanimous recommendation, led by Councilmember Paul Kortez, would require a phased…
Plastic Bag, Bag Ban, Los Angeles (image from Change.org's Denver Ban)
Heal the Bay has been leading the fight to end the fiscal and environmental waste created by single-use shopping bags for five years. So we were heartened today to see the Los Angeles Times' editorial board urging the Los Angeles City Council to adop…
Los Angeles Times, Plastic Bags
Today's blogger is Kirsten James, Heal the Bay's water quality director. All too often when I mention the topic of TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads), people’s eyes start to glaze over. What’s a TMDL you ask? It’s a calculation of the maximum …
TMDL, Sampling, EPA, Water Quality, Science
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