Take L.A. By Storm

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UPDATE 11/8/12: In the face of serious concerns from Heal the Bay, our environmental partners and the USEPA, the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board adopted the proposed stormwater permit for L.A. County on November 8. Read more about the vote.

When it rains in L.A. County, millions of gallons of water flow over paved surfaces like rooftops, sidewalks, parking lots, and streets. This "urban runoff" picks up animal waste, metals, oil, toxic materials, bacteria, and pathogens, carrying them to our storm drain system to be dumped into our local rivers and beaches, usually with little or no treatment. We need common-sense regulation and strong protections to ensure that the cities and dischargers meet water quality standards that safeguard your and your family's health.

We are now working with our partners to determine next steps. We dispute the ongoing and erroneous assertion that implementing stormwater pollution plans will cost regional cities billions of dollars. Numerous municipalities around the nation have undertaken innovative and effective stormwater projects that provide multiple benefits at limited expense.

We are grateful to everyone who supported “Take LA By Storm” over the last few months! Without everyone’s strong advocacy, the permit would be in a much weaker state and we wouldn’t have these strong requirements in place.

This grassroots campaign needs your donations to stop the attack on clean water.

Sign up for our Action Alerts to stay up to date on the Take L.A. by Storm campaign, or follow us on Twitter for real-time updates with the hashtag #LAbyStorm.  

It’s not every day that we get to report some good news.  But today, reflecting on the last 14 years, we can confidently say that our local beaches and creeks are on a solid path for improved water quality.
Clean Water Act Heal the Bay consent decree TMDL Los Angeles
On January 8, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the suit, Los Angeles County Flood Control District v. Natural Resources Defense Council, which was initiated by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Los Angeles Waterkeeper in 2008. The suit …
Supreme Court Rules on L.A. County Storm Water
Last Thursday marked one of my two lowest days here at Heal the Bay working on local water quality regulations. After 11 hours of testimony and deliberation, the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board unanimously voted to approve a municipa…
Take LA By Storm MS4 Urban runoff stormwater regulation
In the face of serious concerns from Heal the Bay, our environmental partners and the USEPA, the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board adopted the proposed stormwater permit for L.A. County on November 8.
take la by storm heal the bay los angeles stormwater stormdrain pollution ocean
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Help Plant Sycamore Trees in Malibu Creek State Park on November 10
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On Friday, October 5, Heal the Bay supporters and staffers packed a Metropolitan Water District meeting room to lend our voices to the fight to keep strong stormwater protections in place throughout Southern California.
Heal the Bay took the hearing by storm on October 5
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Heal the Bay legislative update climate change Styrofoam plastic bags L.A. River
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