Get Local

connecting as a community

With more than 55 miles of coastline, Los Angeles County is blessed with beautiful beaches that offer a diverse mix of recreational opportunities. From a sunrise stroll along the crescent shoreline at idyllic Leo Carrillo State Park to Fourth of July family picnic beside the fire pits at bustling Dockweiler State Beach, you can find a memorable spot for an invigorating day at the beach. Be it for people watching, biking, surfing, sunbathing, kite flying, playing volleyball, swimming or just loafing, we all have our favorite local spot.

Heal the Bay works hard to protect these special places and keep them free of harmful bacteria and unsightly trash. But we need your help to keep them protected. You can attend one of our educational or volunteer events that we hold at coastal and inland locations throughout the year. You can encourage your local legislator to adopt ocean friendly measures. You can also get weekly updates about the water quality at your favorite spot and more than 90 other sites throughout Los Angeles County via our Beach Report Card.

To help keep you informed about conditions and upcoming events at your favorite local beach, we’ve created a Get Local section and broken down the county coastline into several sub-regions. Click on a region and get current conditions and news about your favorite beaches.

But our work goes beyond the shoreline. You and millions of Angelenos are all connected via a series of watersheds that drain throughout Los Angeles County. We do a lot of work in neighborhoods and schools miles from the sea, helping people make the connection between clean communities and clean seas. The Get Local section also includes information about these outreach activities. Please let us know about ocean-friendly events and efforts in your local area. 

I started volunteering at Heal the Bay as a 22-year- old in 1986.  Over the last 25 years, I have some amazing memories.  Here is an extremely abridged list of a few of the most memorable.
Dorothy and Jack: mentors, friends ... and thwarted wedding photographers
After spending more than half of my life at Heal the Bay, I’ve decided to move on and test the waters in academia at my alma mater, UCLA.  The decision to step down as president of Heal the Bay was one of the toughest decisions of my…
Mark Gold
The Los Angeles City Council’s energy and environment committee today approved an action asking for a Chief Administrative Officer-Chief Legislative Analyst report on a single-use bag ban within 30 days. Also, the Bureau of Sanitation must implemen…
plastic bags, trash, beach, heal the bay, bag ban, los angeles, pollution
The Los Angeles City Council heard testimony from over 60 people today on the long-awaited single-use plastic bag ban.  The environmental community was well represented and attired in natty green.  Other supporters included reusable bag …
Los Angeles, City Hall, plastic bag ban, Heal the Bay
In the Citizens United case last year, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed that corporations have the same rights as citizens. The ruling already has changed the face of electoral politics in America, with unlimited campaign contributions by corporations…
Santa Monica may follow Pittsburgh's footsteps in codifying fundamental rights
Syndicate content